All About Pee Pads

Are pee pads for you and your dog? Are they safe? How do you find out if your dog needs them?

PeePads – The Real Deal?

Pee Pads are an innovation that really sent a plethora of pet owners worldwide into a thankful frenzy. The good people at marketing agencies would have you believe that these are indispensable commodities that no pet should have to go without. Here’s a breakdown of what these are and what you should consider before deciding to train your pooch with pee/potty pads.

Pee pads, frankly, indeed are quite a useful product. Once you train your dog and get him onto using them, you can safely say goodbye to ever finding mushy pieces of pooch-poo on your rug. They make life inordinately easier for people who live in high rises and have to go through the daily rigamarole of accompanying a pup in need of an urgent release through 20 storeys in a fancy lift; Or for those who live in colder climates and have a hard time dealing with their furkid’s keen bladder when outdoors.

Not to mention, if you have a sick or a senile dog, pee pads can be quite the lifesaver there as well.

Not Without Effort Though

Dogs don’t automatically and intuitively catch onto pee pads or poo pads.

Pee pad manufacturers claim that the pads’ scent naturally attracts dogs to eliminate on them. Maybe so, if you’re using them in a small space, like a puppy pen. It’s common knowledge that one hears from plenty of disgruntled dog owners baffled because their puppies sleep on the pee pads, pee next to the pee pads, and defecate behind the sofa. For a puppy or a tiny dog, a pee pad in the far corner of the room might as well be in Tibet.

Getting Your Dog to Use Pee Pads

Do this exactly as you’d housetrain in the usual, outdoor way: confine and closely supervise your pup between his frequent toilet breaks. Lead him to the pad on a leash and give him a while to eliminate. If he eliminates, he gets praise and a few minutes of cuddling and affection, then goes back to his confinement area till the next toilet outing. If he doesn’t eliminate, put him back in the confinement area for five or ten minutes, then give him another shot.

Why not newspapers? Plenty of people use it with no problem. The catch is that once some dogs learn to love eliminating on newsprint, their love is lifelong. And which dogs are those? No way to know in advance. Nuff said.

Pros

They’re very comfortable for your dog

Cleaning up is a breeze

Ideal if your dog is unable to go outdoors

Cons

The one and only major gripe that most dog owners have with pee pads is that their dogs get used to them to readily, once they are trained to use them. It is a common complaint that the dog won’t evacuate even during long walks in the outdoors but heads to the pee-pad right on getting home. This can be quite frustrating but is definitely not insurmountable. All it takes is proper training to encourage your dog to learn that while pee pads are great indoors, nothing compares to relieving himself in the great outdoors.

What and Where?

Find a great selection of pee and poo pads at jawdropping prices at PerroMart here!

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Updated: August 29, 2017.

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