/Breed Introduction: American Eskimo Dog
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Breed Introduction: American Eskimo Dog

Breed Introduction: American Eskimo Dog

The American Eskimo Dog is a breed of companion dog, which originated in Germany. The American Eskimo is a member of the Spitz family. Eskies are lively, active companion dogs who love to entertain and join all family activities. They are outgoing and friendly with family and friends, but reserved with strangers. The Eskimo is primarily a companion dog and a devoted family member who thrives in the middle of family activities. They are cheerful, affectionate, sometimes rowdy and very smart. They are independent thinkers, curious, with an uncanny ability to problem-solve. They excel in activities that require them to use their brains, such as obedience training, tricks, agility, conformation, and other dog sports.

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Breed Origin

The American Eskimo dog is a member of the Spitz family. Spitz dogs are Nordic dogs with foxlike faces, profuse coats, tails carried up over the back, and pricked ears. The true origin of the American Eskimo Dog is unknown. What is known is that in the United States, small, white Spitz-type dogs were commonly found in German immigrant communities. These dogs were most likely descendants of the white German Spitz that came to America with their German families. They came to be known collectively as American Spitz dogs In 1917, the American Spitz was renamed the American Eskimo Dog, though today nobody really knows why. The American Eskimo Dog Club of America was founded in 1985, and in 1995, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in the Non-Sporting Group.

Breed Characteristics

The American Eskimo dog comes in three sizes: Toy, Miniature, and Standard. Toys stand 9 to 12 inches and weigh about 10 pounds. Miniatures stand 12 to 15 inches and weigh about 20 pounds. Standards stand 15 inches to 19 inches and weigh about 30 pounds.

The strong-willed Eskimo also needs a  confident owner who can take charge in teaching and leading him. He learns quickly, so training is fun and highly successful.

The Eskimo does well in a variety of homes, from apartments to large houses with yards — as long as he’s an indoor dog. This breed isn’t suited for life in the backyard. They are happiest when they are with their family.

The white, fluffy American Eskimo Dog has a double coat with a dense undercoat and a longer outer coat. The hair is straight with no curl or wave. They have a pronounced ruff around the neck. The front and rear legs are well feathered, and the fur on the tail is profuse.

Despite its light coloring, the Eskimo is amazingly easy to keep clean. Eskimo fur contains oil, which prevents dirt from adhering to it. When an Eskimo gets dirty, the dirt usually brushes right out as long as the fur is dry.