/Breed Introduction: Weimaraner Dog
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Breed Introduction: Weimaraner Dog

The Weimaraner is a large dog that was originally bred for hunting in the early 19th century. Early Weimaraners were used by royalty for hunting large game such as boar, bear and deer.

It was originally bred as a gundog to handle big game like deer and bear, this was a highly sought-after dog breed in its native Germany. Today, these elegant but demanding dogs can still be found out on the hunting grounds, but can also make a fine family friend if well exercised. Today, Weimaraners are affectionately called Weims, Silver Ghosts, or Gray Ghosts. Part of their appeal lies in their sleek mouse-gray to silver-gray coat and light amber, blue-gray, or gray eyes. The elegant, aristocratic dogs are loving and devoted.

Breed Origin

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The Weimaraner dates to the early 19th century, when it was developed at the Weimar court in what is now Germany. The noblemen there loved hunting and they wanted a dog with courage, intelligence, good scenting ability, speed, and stamina. This dog would stick close to them as they walked in search of game and would be a close companion in the evening by the fireside.
In 1897, an exclusive club was stared in Germany to maintain the breed and ensure that responsible breeders would oversee its development. No one was allowed to buy a Weimaraner unless they joined the club. Strict guidelines were imposed upon the breeding of Weimaraners.

It ranks 30th among the 155 breeds and varieties registered by the AKC.

Breed Characteristics

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Male Weimaraners stand 25 to 27 inches at the shoulder and weigh 70 to 85 pounds. Females are between 23 and 25 inches tall and weigh 55 to 70 pounds.

The Weimaraner is friendly, fearless, alert, and obedient, all traits that make him an excellent companion and watchdog. On the flip side, he’s assertive, smart, restless, and willful. This is a dog who will take over the household if you give him half a chance.

Weimaraners were bred to have a lot of energy and stamina. Be prepared to provide them with lots of exercise and mental stimulation. Weims aren’t a soft-mouthed dog like a Golden Retriever and some have a low tolerance for small, furry animals, such as rabbits, and even cats and dogs. Until you know your dog well, watch him carefully when small animals are in his presence.

The first thing that should be kept in mind about the Weimaraner is that he’s a housedog. He’s not meant for kennel or backyard life, and he’s also not suited to apartment living. This highly active dog needs a large, securely fenced yard where he can run, and an active family who can provide him with the exerciseand mental stimulation he needs.

The Weimaraner’s coat is short, smooth, sleek, and solid-colored, ranging from mouse-gray to silver-gray, usually with lighter shades on the head and ears. A distinctly long coat is a disqualification according to the American Kennel Club breed standard.